READ & DOWNLOAD The Killing of Crazy Horse 107

SUMMARY ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ☆ Thomas Powers

SUMMARY ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ☆ Thomas Powers Horse a dangerous rival No Water and Woman Dress both of whom hated Crazy Horse and schemed against him the young interpreter Billy Garnett son of a fifteen year old Oglala woman and a Confederate general killed at Gettysburg General George Crook who bitterly resented newspaper reports that he had been whipped by Crazy Horse in battle Little Big Man who betrayed Crazy Horse Lieutenant William Philo Clark the smart West Point graduate who thought he could work Indians to do the Army s bidding and Fast Thunder who called Crazy Horse cousin held him the moment he was stabbed and then told his grand. Honestly I don t know whether I m getting dumber with each passing year or if this book was extremely dense but it took me forever to get through it It was really good and it was worth the effort but boy I had to be on top of the thing all the time to keep all the information straight And I even went into it with a reasonable grasp of the issues events and players which I thought would help but apparently not The author goes back to A LOT of source material to flesh out the events of Honestly I don t know whether I m getting dumber with each passing year or if this book was extremely dense but it took me forever to get through it It was really good and it was worth the effort but boy I had to be on top of the thing all the time to keep all the information straight And I even went into it with a reasonable grasp of the issues events and players which I thought would help but apparently not The author goes back to A LOT of source material to flesh out the events of the Sioux Wars and the factors that ultimately resulted in the killing of Crazy Horse in 1877 Most of it was fascinating he really assembled a lot of different view points and overall did a great job of connecting the dots without making any wild leaps or assumptions It all came together as a really informing study of this era of US history Of course in addition to being informing it was also maddening because just urgh the unfairness of it all was tangible I mean at literally every turn EVERY TURNMy biggest issue with the book was a choice to break with a roughly chronological structure and give the detailed account of Little Big Horn after Crazy Horse s and others eventual acuiescence and agreement to end the war At this point I thought I was losing my mind because I knew it happened and was wildly flipping back through the book because I thought I missed it while in some fugue state it could happen In retrospect I see the point it IS the dramatic part and I can see the rationale of putting it in the order that the US forces learned of the details of the battle so I guess it works as the big reveal But still I needed some sort of clearer framework to let me know this was what was happening There were a few other things I would love to ask the author about on the top of that list is the fact he used Sioux a lotthan is usual these days given that it s not the name these people used for themselves He does mention it but then continues to casually throw it around a lot in addition to understandably keeping Sioux as it was used in contemporaneous accounts I thought this was a terrific book but it is a commitment I would recommend to folks who are already fairly familiar with this topic and looking for a deeper perspective

READ The Killing of Crazy Horse

READ & DOWNLOAD The Killing of Crazy Horse 107 å He was the greatest Indian warrior of the nineteenth century His victory over General Custer at the battle of Little Bighorn in was the worst defeat inflicted on the frontier Army And the death of Crazy Horse in federal custody has remained a controversy for than a century The Killing of Crazy Ho Son thirty years later They tricked me They tricked me At the center of the story is Crazy Horse himself the warrior of few words whom the Crow said they knew best among the Sioux because he always came closest to them in battle No photograph of him exists todayThe death of Crazy Horse was a traumatic event not only in Sioux but also in American history With the Great Sioux War as background and context drawing on many new materials as well as documents in libraries and archives Thomas Powers recounts the final months and days of Crazy Horse s life not to lay blame but to establish what happened. Powers account of the Battle of the Little Big Horn is one of the clearest I have ever readAnd his account of Crazy Horse s death makes one want to weep

Thomas Powers ☆ 7 READ & DOWNLOAD

The Killing of Crazy HorseHe was the greatest Indian warrior of the nineteenth century His victory over General Custer at the battle of Little Bighorn in was the worst defeat inflicted on the frontier Army And the death of Crazy Horse in federal custody has remained a controversy for than a century The Killing of Crazy Horse pieces together the many sources of fear and misunderstanding that resulted in an official killing hard to distinguish from a crime A rich cast of characters whites and Indians alike passes through this story including Red Cloud the chief who dominated Oglala history for fifty years but saw in Crazy. The officer of the guard Lieutenant Henry Lemly was inside the building There were two rooms Turning Bear leading the way entered the first room through the door that had been ajar with the rest close on his heels To the right was a door into a second room In the door was a window with bars The door opened In the second room were several men It was said later that these men were wearing chains Their feet were attached to iron balls The chains could be heard rattling Charging First The officer of the guard Lieutenant Henry Lemly was inside the building There were two rooms Turning Bear leading the way entered the first room through the door that had been ajar with the rest close on his heels To the right was a door into a second room In the door was a window with bars The door opened In the second room were several men It was said later that these men were wearing chains Their feet were attached to iron balls The chains could be heard rattling Charging First heard a shout from inside the building Turning Bear shouted out It s the jail He shouted Turn back He rushed back out through the door that had been ajar Charging First heard the man rushing out say There are bodies hanging in that room In this instant Crazy Horse lost his weakness When the inner door was opened to pass Crazy Horse in Billy Garnett said later it dawned on him that he was a prisoner With tremendous force Crazy Horse lunged back pulling away from the door Thomas Powers The Killing of Crazy Horse Mount Rush is one of the purest tourist traps yet devised by the hand of man The four presidential faces carved into the granite prominence have little or no connection at all to South Dakota Of the three only Teddy Roosevelt ever set foot on the land or even knew South Dakota as a State Still it serves its purpose which is to get people to come to South Dakota And it works to the tune of three million people a year all of whom come to see and be disappointed by the skulls of four white presidents blasted onto the side of a mountain sacred to the Lakota Less than twenty miles away and uite a bit less finished is the Crazy Horse Monument Developed in the same vein as Rush that is making men out of mountains it has been under construction for 63 years and at its present pace will be completed sometime before the end of the world but long after our own deaths The historical ironist can make uite a day out of the two monuments the four gleaming heads jutting from sacred rock representative of 150 years of American history the steamrolling crush of Anglo Saxon civilization as it swept westward from the Atlantic and the unfinished Indian on horseback the defender of the Black Hills who was lied to by the Federal Government betrayed by his own people and then stabbed in the back by a United States soldier You got your winner and your loser right there just seventeen miles apart Reflect if you will And don t forget to take a picture of yourself in which you use perspective to make it seem like you are picking Jefferson s nose In terms of name recognition Crazy Horse is the most famous Indian in history Tecumseh and Pontiac had grander visions and commandedhearts and minds but the travails of the Eastern woodland tribes have been long eclipsed by the romantic plight of the great horse tribes of the plains Sitting Bull is widely known but he was a spiritual leader and therefore harder to understand than Crazy Horse s distilled warrior essence Red Cloud and Spotted Tail were as fierce of fighters in their primes as Crazy Horse was in his but they are hampered the intertribal politics in which they were snagged following their surrender to the US Government Crazy Horse is the most famous because he was unreconstructed right up to the end The Indian Wars are complicated Crazy Horse is simple He was a warrior and the way of the warrior is death He fought all his life he didn t suffer white men he didn t wear white men s clothes he didn t involve himself in white men s politics he never allowed his picture to be taken and in the end he chose death over a jail cell There is something eminently noble about him so much so that 71 years after we murdered him we decided to carve him into a mountainsideRight in the middle of the place he believed the world began Just like he would ve wanted Thomas Powers The Killing of Crazy Horse purports to tell the story of Crazy Horse s death and the wild swirling scheming characters and events that brought him to his end In May 1877 less than a year after the stunning defeat of George Custer at the Little Big Horn Crazy Horse arrived at Camp Robinson Nebraska as a prelude to a formal surrender For the next few months Crazy Horse camped near Camp Robinson while poisonous rumors filled the air rumors that Crazy Horse was going to slip away rumors that Crazy Horse was going to resume his war against the whites rumors that Crazy Horse intended to assassinate General George Crook Crook ordered Crazy Horse s arrest and sent soldiers against his village The village scattered and Crazy Horse escaped to nearby Spotted Tail Agency After meeting with a sympathetic officer Lieutenant Jesse Lee Crazy Horse agreed to return to Camp Robinson Unbeknownst to him Crazy Horse s arrest had been ordered When Crazy Horse arrived at Camp Robinson he was led to the guardhouse When he saw the iron bars he tried to escape His own people chief among them Little Big Man tried to hold him down A soldier stabbed him in the back once perhaps twice mortally wounding him Powers does a great job with Crazy Horse s last few months of life To be sure it is a controversial period of time The sheer number of myths rumors half truths and lies orbiting his murder makes any retelling particularly fraught However Powers carefully parses all the primary sources searches for corroborating testimony and weighs the motivations and competing interests of each witness The result is a thorough comprehensive staggeringly detailed story one that reads like Shakespeare s Julius Caesar as filtered through the lens of John Ford The problem though is that the last few months of Crazy Horse s life is only told in the final uarter of what is a nearly 500 page book Don t let the title fool you This isthan the story of a single man s death Rather it is a sprawling lumpy oft disjointed history of the Great Sioux War of 1876 77 It is both fun and frustrating The Killing of Crazy Horse begins appropriately enough with a short biography about Crazy Horse Unfortunately this mini biography is terrible It is riddled with gaps no mention of Crazy Horse s presence at the Grattan Massacre or his fight against General Sumner marred by falsehoods and factual inaccuracies Powers claims like so many others that Crazy Horse was among the decoys at the Fetterman Fight despite no primary sources to this end and is a chronological nightmare with almost no attempt to place the events of Crazy Horse s life on some kind of timeline As clunky and unhelpful as this introduction was I was evendisturbed by what happens to Crazy Horse next he disappears Yes in a book in which his name adorns the title the central character is unseen and unheard for exasperatingly long stretches Partially this is due to the essential nature of Crazy Horse he was reclusive even among his own people Partially though it is a fault of this book s structure which is mostly no discernible structure at all Like the characters on Season 5 of Lost Powers keeps jumping forward and backward through time For example Powers doesn t deliver a chapter on the Little Big Horn until well after discussing the Battle of Slim Buttes which occurred several months after Custer s death I assume this was done for dramatic purposes but there are better ways to convey drama than dicing the chronology like a carrot beneath a Ginsu The Crazy Horse free interstices are filled with characters secondary to the ultimate drama of Crazy Horse s death Red Cloud the interpreter William Garnett the half breed frontiersman Frank Grouard Lieutenant Philo Clark and General Crook the much maligned but fundamentally decent soldier who helped precipitate Crazy Horse s murder The events that are covered include Custer s 1874 expedition into the Black Hills which discovered gold which necessitated our breaking the Laramie Treaty of 1868 which led to the Great Sioux War which allowed us to dynamite presidential visages into Dakota granite which allows me to come full circle the Battle of the Rosebud the Battle of the Little Big Horn and the Battle of Slim ButtesAt its core my critiue is one of focus not uality Indeed I believe this is a case in which the parts are greater than the whole For instance I thought the mini biographies on Red Cloud and General Crook were well done I especially liked Powers reliance on Crook s unfinished unpublished autobiography The West was full of incredible characters with ready made nicknames and I can t fault Powers for lingering on as many as possible Powers also delivers some great set pieces Despite a desperately needed map his account of the Battle of the Rosebud is judicious in both analysis and conclusion I also liked his retelling of Slim Buttes which was an emblematic encounter of the Indian Wars a small number of participants a lot of shooting a small number of casualties but somehow very brutal and very ugly Surprisingly I even liked Powers chapter on the Little Big Horn despite my doubts I strongly believe that it is nearly impossible to give a reasoned description of the Little Big Horn in anything less than book length form Powers was able to give a dramatic reasonable reconstruction of the battle that highlights Crazy Horse s contribution while resisting the temptation to credit him with the Indians victory Crazy Horse s role at the Little Big Horn has always been overhyped The second time I went to the battlefield the ranger s interpretive talk posited that Crazy Horse overwhelmed Custer by executing a massive charge that swept around to the north of Custer s position and took him from behind Because that s how Indians fight Like the British at Balaclava Needless to say while listening to this ranger I had to count slowly to one hundred in my head to keep from interrupting The problem as I see it is that these parts fail to merge into a coherent narrative There is a very obvious starting point to this book Crazy Horse s birth And there is a very obvious ending point to this book Crazy Horse s death But somehow despite the inherent linearity of a man s life and death all the skipping around the chronological rearrangements and the odd inclusions and elisions create a plot that is harder to follow than the Pirates of the Caribbean movies My hypothesis is that the confused through line is the result of too much research It s plain to see both by reading the text the notes and the bibliography that Powers did his homework It s also relatively plain that he wanted to show this knowledge off like a new car His narrative is crammed with long sometimes repetitive digressions on topics as varied as the contents of a Lakota medicine bag the trials of the Sun Dance and the construction of a shield Oftentimes these are interesting digressions Other times they are just pointless For instance Powers spends somewhere in the neighborhood of six pages discussing General Crook s peevishness with General Sheridan over a perceived slight at the Battle of Winchester during the Civil War Really Maybe you could ve stuffed that little gem into a footnote while spending a littletime fleshing out Crazy Horse Though I hasten to add hard evidence on Crazy Horse is hard to find There is a taut rigidly constructed two hundred page thriller lost somewhere in this unwieldy 470 page tome Disappointment lurks for those who value brevity conciseness and clockwork pacing On the other hand there are pleasures awaiting for those who don t mind the work of studied raconteur