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Bactria by Hugh George RawlinsUropean as well as through coins inscriptions and architectural remnants Bactria served as a contact point between Europe South Asia and the Far East for than two hundred years before disappearing under the pressure of a resurgent Persia to the west and Indian states to the east In Bactria The History of a Forgotten Empire historian Hugh G Rawlinson begins with the early history of Bactria and its subjugation by Persia and then describes the conuest of Iran by Alexander the Great and the establishment of an independent Bactria ruled by Greeks The Bactrians adopted B. My ratings of books on Goodreads are solely a crude ranking of their utility to me and not an evaluation of literary merit entertainment value social importance humor insightfulness scientific accuracy creative vigor suspensefulness of plot depth of characters vitality of theme excitement of climax satisfaction of ending or any other combination of dimensions of value which we are expected to boil down through some fabulous alchemy into a single digit

Free read Bactria by Hugh George Rawlinson

Free read Bactria by Hugh George Rawlinson · PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ä An Important Account of the Greek State That Ruled the Hindu Kush for Centuries in the Wake of Alexander the Great“If through the Bactrian Empire European ideas were transmitted to the Far East through that and similar channels Asiatic ideas fUddhism early on and helped establish the religion throughout the area The author then follows the history of the empire through its rulers including Menander until Greek rule was extinguished around 135 BC Finally the author discusses the effects of Greek occupation on the region Based on meticulous research in ancient texts from Greece Persia and India and using material evidence of the time this history which won the Hare University Prize at Cambridge in 1909 remains relevant today providing a fascinating portrait of a little known connection between East and Wes. To be an old book it is very concise and clear It lacks a liable time line of the events that happened in Bactria but it is understandable that there are little information about the subject especially than 100 years ago It doesn't jump to conclusions uickly It is a very good introduction though

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An Important Account of the Greek State That Ruled the Hindu Kush for Centuries in the Wake of Alexander the Great“If through the Bactrian Empire European ideas were transmitted to the Far East through that and similar channels Asiatic ideas found their way to Europe” Intellectual Development of EuropeFollowing the Macedonian invasion of Persian in the fourth century BC an independent Greek ruled empire emerged over an area encompassing modern Afghanistan eastern Iran and northern Pakistan This ancient empire called Bactria is recorded in texts both Asian and E. In the decades of chaos following Alexander's flouncing last words as his vast conuests fragmented into endless suabbling petty kingdoms a Greek ish empire arose roughly in Afghanistan but at times its territory stretched from Iran and Turkmenistan to India And now if people recognise its name at all that's just for the camels mentioned only once here and that to note their absence from the ancient sources Rawlinson's really not kidding about that 'forgotten' this is not just information which is obscure to the general reader it's a tapestry of shadows and guesswork The list even of Bactria's rulers is spotty and can at best be pieced tentatively together from fragmentary ancient sources probably inexact even when they were complete and numismatic inference Even the one name among them that sparks some glimmer of recognition Menander has such basic details as the decades of his reign shrouded in doubt There were great wars and mighty feats of valour at one siege hundreds stood against tens of thousands and prevailed and half the time not only are the individual soldiers' names lost to us but we don't even know for sure who the enemy was or what the fight was about A melancholy reminder of uite how much oblivion has claimed and how a glorious ruler of sweeping dominions may go further into the darkness even than Ozymandias 'General reader' having a different meaning in 1912 to now given the introductory assertion that they are the intended audience followed by various untranslated passages in Latin Greek and even Sanskrit And while that makes this monograph whatever happened to monographs sound like the product of a much civilised age one conversely hopes that by his death in the fifties Rawlinson was perhaps a little less free with the comfortable assertions of Aryan supremacy to the native stock