Swords Against the Senate: The Rise of the Roman Army and the Fall of the Republic review í 9

review Swords Against the Senate: The Rise of the Roman Army and the Fall of the Republic

Swords Against the Senate: The Rise of the Roman Army and the Fall of the Republic review í 9 õ After Rome defeated its age old enemy Carthage it was the undisputed ruler of a vast empireYet at the heart of the Roman Republic was a peculiar flaw an uneradicable tension between the aristocT amid military and political turmoil the smoldering anger of the common people a petty war against a treacherous North African prince an invasion by Germans and an Italian political uprising In the crisis Gaius Marius the people's general rises to despotic power but is eventually replaced by the brutal dictator Sulla who in turn spawns the man who woul. Needs maps for those not familiar with the geography of the Roman world

read Ò E-book, or Kindle E-pub Å Erik Hildinger

After Rome defeated its age old enemy Carthage it was the undisputed ruler of a vast empireYet at the heart of the Roman Republic was a peculiar flaw an uneradicable tension between the aristocracy and the plebians and each regarded themselves as the foundation of Rome's military powerSwords Against the Senate relates how the republic began to come apar. The period in Roman history between the fall of Carthage and the rise of Caesar is relatively overlooked But it's a very important part of Roman history Much of what brought about the fall of the Republic occurred during these years and much of it has relevance to what we see going on in the US and around the world today All too often half informed pundits use the fall of the Roman Empire as a warning usually with gross misunderstandings of what caused that fall but that's less important to a modern democracy than the fall of the Republic The Roman empire was an autocracy a dictatorship and its fall is less relevant to us that the collapse of a functioning republic that had thrived for several hundred years Two key intertwined things contributed to the fall of the Republic the willingness of those in various positions of power to ignore constitutional norms and precedents the willingness of those in power to use violence in seeking their endsOften those doing these things didn't look to the long term but only at what was immediately in front of them Sometimes they even did this for good reason Tiberius Gracchus forcing out a lone tribune who was blocking reforms for example but the precedent set led to and greater breaches in precedent Hildinger does an effective job detailing the steps in the collapse of the Republic starting with the Gracchi who ignored constitutional precedent and the Senate response resulting in the murder of the elder brother starting the escalating trend of violence being used within Rome for political ends up through the violent clashes between Marius and Sulla who lead armies against Rome itself My only real complaint with the book is that it violates what I think is one rule for good history books it contains no maps so some parts including the descriptions of the wars within Italy and in the East can be a bit hard to follow Otherwise though I recommend it

Erik Hildinger Å 9 free read

Swords Against the Senate The Rise of the Roman Army and the Fall of the RepublicD transform turmoil into imperial triumph Julius Caesar In this fast paced fact filled work personal intrigue treachery and occasional moral virtue vie for the reins of power The Roman army once invincible against foreign antagonists becomes a tool for the powerful and government its foe Erik Hildinger has written a fascinating insightful work of histor. I thought this was an excellent book especially as an addition to any course on Ancient Rome The book was well written and informative on a subject that has the tendency to get extremely tedious and fact heavy Hildinger was able to pin point some of the very real issues that brought down the Roman Republic in a digestible yet intelligent way I very much wish I had had of this type of reading to supplement other periods of Ancient Rome